6 Tips For Writing A Great Ad for Your Dance Studio
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Home | Free Sample Content | 6 Tips For Writing A Great Ad for Yo . . .
 





6 Tips For Writing A Great Ad for Your Dance Studio


If you have decided to go with an ad there are many ways you can make it - and your studio - stand out from the crowd. Writing an effective ad isn't just a matter of compiling the information and paying a fee--there are some key elements that you can employ to increase the chances your advertising dollars are being spent wisely.

Here are six great tips for writing an ad that will help you get students through the door:

  1. Write a fantastic headline. Grab attention with a headline that has impact. Too many ads simply say the name of the studio or announce that classes are starting. Come up with something that makes readers want to check out the rest of the ad, such as "Free Trial Dance Class" or "Beginning Adult Ballet Class Starting" or "Have you always wanted to learn how to dance?" or "Does your child love to dance?"

  2. Communicate why you are different. An ad is an opportunity to highlight what makes your studio special. You can get that message across if you take the time to word things well. A "tagline" is a great way to do this, so you may want to come up with something that represents who you are, such as "We put families first" or "Training for the pre-professional dance student" or "Classes for all ages and experience".

  3. Brand the ad. Use your font and logo on the ad so that people know it's your studio right away. That kind of recognition is something you build over time, and it should be on everything you do that will be in the public eye. Ads included.

  4. Keep it simple. Just because you can add more text or images doesn't mean you have to do it. Sometimes an ad can get cluttered, which can take away from the visual appeal. When you mock up the ad, step back and see if there is anything that you can remove that will make it look cleaner. Get a few opinions before you finalize it.

  5. Include contact information. Be sure that people can reach you in a way that is convenient for them. Having a phone number and website address on the ad is crucial, and it's a good idea to put the street address too if you have the room.

  6. Have a call to action. Simply presenting information isn't enough to fill your classes. Include a call to action in the ad to get people to take the next step. For example, offer a discount for those who bring in the ad, or include "early bird" registration prices with a cut-off date or stress that class size is limited and encourage the reader to take action to hold or register for a spot.

Although writing a great ad doesn't have to be a difficult process, it does take a little bit of time and thought. The six tips above will help you put something together that will represent your studio well and encourage people to get in touch. This is the first step in the process of connecting with potential students and growing your business.

Want help with writing a great ad that captures the attention of potential new students? Visit our member only discussion forum to get personalized help today.




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